Bergamot

Bergamot

Bergamot

 

Fragrance: Fresh, spicy, floral and citrusy

Bergamot essential oil is made from the hand or cold-pressed rind of a nearly ripe fruit of the bergamot tree, also known as the Citrus bergamia from the Rutaceae family. The bergamot orange tree is the result of the cross-breeding of the lemon tree and the orange tree, which explains its pear-like shape and yellow color.

100 bergamot oranges will yield only about 3 ounces or 85 grams of bergamot oil.

Although its roots can be traced back to South East Asia, bergamot was more widely cultivated in Southern Italy, specifically in the coastal regions of Reggio di Calabria and Sicily.

Bergamot essential oil was named after the city of Bergamo in Lombardy, Italy, where it was originally sold. Bergamot is also produced in the Ivory Coast, Argentina, Morocco, Turkey, and Brazil.

Uses of Bergamot Oil

Bergamot essential oil is a natural mosquito repellant, insect-bite salve, deodorant, inhalant, and relaxing massage oil.

Sweet and citrus scent – Because of its unique fruity and subtly spicy aroma, bergamot oil is frequently added to different perfume and cosmetic products. Bergamot oil is a major ingredient in the original 4711 Eau De Cologne by Johann Maria Farina at the beginning of 18th-century Germany.

Bergamot oil blends perfectly well with other essential oils such as cedarwood, citronella, clary sage, geranium, ho leaf, neroli, lavender, lemon, palmarosa, rosewood, tangerine, and ylang-ylang.

Fruity flavoring – If Italians have bergamot marmalade, people in Sweden and Norway enjoy bergamot-flavored snus, a smokeless, sugar-free tobacco from the 18th century.  It is also used as the distinct flavoring in Earl Grey and Lady Grey teas, and in delectable confectionaries such as the Turkish Delight.

Pest repellant – To shield crops from being attacked by pests, bergamot plant, whose roots have a potent odor, is grown as a companion crop on vegetable gardens.

Benefits of Bergamot Oil

Bergamot oil boasts of powerful antibacterial, analgesic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, and soothing effects. Back in the day, Italians used bergamot oil in folk medicine to cool fevers and expel intestinal worms.

The juice of the bergamot fruit, on the other hand, was used in Calabrian indigenous medicine to treat and malaria.  In addition, bergamot essential oil:

Alleviates symptoms and complications of bacterial infections – According to a study published in the April 2009 issue of the Journal of Applied Microbiology, bergamot oil can produce positive results against Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis bacteria that are resistant to the potent antibiotic vancomycin.

These enterococcal species are a common source of a variety of infections, including urinary tract infections (UTI), bacteremia, endocarditis, and meningitis. Just add bergamot oil to your sitz bath or hip bath to help prevent the spread of bacterial infections from the urethra into the bladder.

Prevents and improves skin conditions from fungal infections – In a study published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Italian researchers have proven bergamot essential oil’s amazing anti-fungal properties when used as a topical remedy for infections brought by candida fungus strains.

Reduces anxiety and stress – Experts say that when used in aromatherapy preparations, bergamot oil can lessen stress and anxiety levels of patients prior to surgery. It also helps relieve depression.

Blends Well With: Chamomile- citrus oils- coriander- cypress- geranium- jasmine- juniper- lavender, melissa- neroli- nutmeg- rose- sandalwood- vetiver- violet- ylang ylang

 

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